Week in Review

Top highlights include: Halting U.S. HIV epidemic by 2030, what is rhabdomyolysis, higher education won’t prevent mental decline, what is echinacea—and can it really help a cold, and vaccine researcher’s advice about the flu

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • February 8, 2019

Top highlights include: E-cigarettes are effective at helping smokers quit, injection opioid use linked to increases in stroke hospitalizations, lowering blood pressure may help cut risk of early dementia, Dr. Vincent Rajkumar specializes in multiple myeloma, and do you need to worry about a fever if you have the flu.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • February 1, 2019

Top highlights include: Top names in health and medicine gather in Davos for World Economic Forum, blood test may predict Alzheimer’s progression, Mayo Clinic study finds mindfulness can ease women’s menopausal symptoms, preventing the flu, and frosty grip brings frostbite fears and other weather-related worries.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • January 25, 2019

Top highlights include: People choosing not to vaccinate is now a global health threat, sleeping less than six hours a night may boost risk of cardiovascular disease, long-acting contraceptive patch gives women DIY option for birth control, early capillary damage may predict dementia, and norovirus cases rise in winter months.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • January 18, 2019

Top highlights include: concussion-detection device developed by Minnesota doctor gets FDA OK, Alzheimer’s disease may develop differently in African-Americans, cervical cancer screenings lower than national data suggests, Mayo Clinic uses AI for new heart screening test, and flu cases on the rise.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • January 11, 2019

Top highlights include: Mediterranean diet named the best for 2019, another blood pressure medication recalled over trace amounts of cancer-causing chemical, Dr. Gianrico Farrugia, President and CEO of Mayo Clinic, what your headaches can tell you about your health, and Mayo Clinic discovers biological markers that could guide treatment for prostate cancer.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • January 4, 2019

Top highlights include: healthiest and least healthy states of 2018, predicting “C. difficile” with 5 key factors, migraines can cause altered speech, nonprofit launches trial to get therapies to multiple myeloma patients more efficiently, and treating the “stomach flu.”

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • December 28, 2018

Top highlights include: women with heart emergencies less likely to get proper care, managing diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after Richter’s transformation, Mayo re-creates historic Christmas decorations, which flu shot should you get?, and treating blood cancers with CAR-T cell therapy.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • December 21, 2018

Top highlights include: HIV research halted after NIH freezes acquisition of fetal tissue, genetic changes associated with physical activity reported, neurofilament light tied to cognitive decline, smoking linked to cognitive dysfunction in fibromyalgia.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • December 14, 2018

Top highlights include: the secret to good health may be a walk in the park, Minnesota adds Alzheimer’s as qualifying condition for medical marijuana, Asian longhorned tick spreading in U.S, 11 diseases that can start with your gut bacteria, and a link between migraines and gastrointestinal problems?

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • December 7, 2018

Top highlights include: dispelling deadly myths about the flu vaccine, coffee drinkers’ personality traits are different from non-coffee drinkers, when the body attacks the brain, scientists claim first genetically edited babies, and complications from the flu.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • November 30, 2018

Top highlights include: romaine lettuce is not safe to eat, CDC warns; scientists genetically modify virus to kill cancer cells; spinal implant breakthroughs are helping people with paraplegia walk again; which migraine patients should get specific drugs; and treating inflammatory bowel disease.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • November 23, 2018

Top highlights include: CDC investigating burst of possible new cases of polio-like paralysis, Mayo Clinic gets $200 million to train doctors of the future, Mayo Clinic names new leader for its growing Jacksonville medical center, info about migraine and heart problems, and Mayo Clinic receives National Cancer Institute grant to help cancer patients quit tobacco.

By Gina Chiri-Osmond • November 16, 2018