Creepy, Dreadful, Wonderful Parasites

Creepy, Dreadful, Wonderful Parasites

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new case, along with the answer to the previous case. Dr. Pritt started her blog after she completed her fellowship at Mayo Clinic in clinical microbiology. She attended the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to study parasitology for one year. During that year in England, Dr. Pritt saw some amazing cases, which she shared with her colleagues back at Mayo through her blog. Through word of mouth, people from all walks of life around the globe have become interested in Dr. Pritt’s “case of the week,” and her readership continues to grow.

Note from Dr. Pritt: All opinions expressed here are mine and not my employer’s. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as, and does not substitute for, medical advice. I do not accept medical consults from patients.

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case is from Idzi Potters and the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. The following object was seen in a concentrated stool specimen from a 3-year-old toddler with diarrhea (40x objective). It measures 45 micrometers in greatest dimension. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • November 6, 2019

In honor of Halloween, Dr. Bobbi Pritt shared her “freaky favorite” parasites ranked from 1 (not too scary) to 5 (bad-news bugs).

By Mayo Clinic News Network • October 31, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. Happy Halloween everyone! In honor of this week, Dr. Pritt has shared photos from her annual Halloween party, and a special ‘unknown’ from Old One. Feel free to guess what guests’ costumes were.

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • October 30, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case was generously donated by Professor Agnes Kurniawan from the University of Indonesia. The following motile structure was reported to emerge from the anus of a man from rural Indonesia. He had no other gastrointestinal symptoms. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • October 23, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case was donated by Blaine Mathison and Marc Couturier. The following forms were seen on peripheral blood smears. No travel history is available at this time. How would you recommend reporting out this case? Are there any additional studies you would recommend?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • October 16, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. It’s time for our first case of the month by Idzi Potters and the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. The patient is a 50 yo Belgian patient returning from Italy with intestinal complaints coughs up the following worm. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • October 9, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case was generously donated by Dr. David Hernandez Gonzalo. The patient is a middle-aged male who presented with abdominal discomfort and nausea. An endoscopy was performed which revealed the following object in the gastric antrum. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • October 2, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features photos and videos from my fabulous Technical Specialists, Heather Arguello and Emily Fernholz. The following were seen in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • September 25, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case is a composite photo Dr. Pritt created for her 2019 calendar for the month of September. The accompanying questions are: What is the parasite shown? (measure ~60 micrometers long) Why is this a suitable parasite for September? What is the significance of the other objects in the picture?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • September 18, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. is our monthly case by Idzi Potters and the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. It’s short and sweet: The following was found in a stool specimen from a 3-year-old child with diarrhea. It measures approximately 80 micrometers in diameter. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • September 11, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case presents a bit of a conundrum from a 50 year old woman with recent travel to Kenya. What is the identification based on the blood smear? How might this correlate with the rapid antigen test?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • August 28, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week, Dr. Pritt’s case involves a parasite found in some fresh salmon. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • August 21, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case was donated by Dr. Neil Harris and Dr. Stacy Beal. The patient is an infant with a history of tracheobronchomalacia and “eosinophilia” on prior bronchoscopy. A routine complete blood count was negative without evidence of peripheral eosinophilia. The following structures were seen on a Giemsa-stained bronchoalveolar lavage specimen using the 100x objective. They have a diameter of 1-3 micrometers. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • August 14, 2019