Creepy, Dreadful, Wonderful Parasites

Creepy, Dreadful, Wonderful Parasites

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new case, along with the answer to the previous case. Dr. Pritt started her blog after she completed her fellowship at Mayo Clinic in clinical microbiology. She attended the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to study parasitology for one year. During that year in England, Dr. Pritt saw some amazing cases, which she shared with her colleagues back at Mayo through her blog. Through word of mouth, people from all walks of life around the globe have become interested in Dr. Pritt’s “case of the week,” and her readership continues to grow. Note from Dr. Pritt: All opinions expressed here are mine and not my employer's. Information provided here is for medical education only. It is not intended as, and does not substitute for, medical advice. I do not accept medical consults from patients.

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. And now for something completely unrelated to COVID-19. For those of you able to get outdoors, keep a look out for these little critters. For those of you stuck inside, you might be happy that you are missing them. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • April 1, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The object below was found in the undergarments of a 35 year-old woman. No other history is provided. What’s the identification? How would you sign this case out?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • March 18, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The following specimen was submitted to surgical pathology for examination. No additional history was available. What’s the identification? What structures are we seeing here?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • March 11, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case was kindly donated by Monica Jarvis and Liliana Arias. The patient is a young child who lives on a family farm. The mother noticed “worms” in the child’s stool and submitted them to the laboratory for identification. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • February 26, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The following were seen in skin scrapings collected from a middle-aged man complaining of itching. The motile objects measure approximately 0.3 mm in length. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • February 19, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The following objects were seen in an EDTA blood specimen obtained from a patient with recent travel to sub-Saharan Africa. What’s the identification? What additional analysis might be indicated?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • February 12, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The following were seen in a direct wet preparation of an unfixed stool specimen from a patient with bloody diarrhea and recent travel to sub-Saharan Africa. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • February 5, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The structures in question were seen in H&E-stained sections of small bowel. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • January 29, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The specimen below was submitted by a young woman who found this “worm” by her arm, right below her mouth, upon waking from a nap. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • January 22, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The following worm was found in a specimen obtained during a colonoscopy. It measured approximately 2 mm long. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • January 15, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. Happy New Years everyone! Can anyone tell who this little arthropod is?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • January 2, 2020

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. Happy Holidays to all readers! Can anyone tell what this little arthropod is?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • December 25, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case is Dr. Charles (Chuck) Sturgis. He noted the following structures on a Papanicolaou-stained anal Pap smear (performed for cancer screening). They measure approximately 14 micrometers in length. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • December 18, 2019