COVID-19 weekly news: December 7 – 13

Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: COVID-19 vaccine update

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, gives an update on vaccine approval and discusses logistics COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

Read more.


Will fast-tracked COVID-19 vaccines be safe?

As health care organizations begin planning for distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, many questions are being asked about their safety and efficacy. Dr. Andrew Badley, an infectious diseases physician at Mayo Clinic and head of Mayo Clinic's COVID-19 Research Task Force, offers some insight on how COVID-19 vaccines were fast-tracked to get them ready for the public.

Read more.


COVID-19 vaccine myths debunked

It is likely that you have heard claims about the COVID-19 vaccine on social media or from people in your life. The quick development and approval of a vaccine may increase your hesitancy about its safety or effectiveness. Let's set the record straight on circulating myths about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Read more.


Having difficult holiday conversations about COVID-19

December is traditionally a time for family and friends to gather and celebrate the most wonderful time of the year. But the COVID-19 pandemic will make this season difficult for many, as health experts recommend staying at home and celebrating the holidays with only your immediate household.

Read more.


Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Pandemic screen time

"Depending on the age of the child there are some considerations, because our younger children are just not meant to be staring at a screen for six, seven hours a day," says Dr. Tina Ardon, a Mayo Clinic Family Medicine physician.

Read more.


Sharing Mayo Clinic: Israeli patient tells his own “life changing” story of heart surgery during COVID-19 pandemic

When Yiftah Geva was diagnosed with a heart condition several years ago, he never expected his journey to treatment would take him 6,000 miles away from home during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read more.


Inside the ultracold freezers that will house COVID-19 vaccines

Mayo Clinic has multiple ultralow temperature freezers designated for vaccine storage and distribution. Each freezer can hold up to 100,000 doses of vaccine. Mayo Clinic has used these freezers for other therapeutics that have required low-temperature storage but none at such low temperatures.

Read more.


Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Residency training adjusts to pandemic restrictions

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Jonathan Barlow, director of the Orthopedic Residency program at Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine, explains how Mayo Clinic has adjusted during the pandemic to continue delivering medical education to fellows, residents and medical students. Dr. Barlow also discusses Mayo Clinic's efforts to diversify its cohort of students.

Read more.


Inside Mayo Clinic’s first COVID-19 vaccination site

For about two weeks, construction crews have worked to transform empty space in Mayo Clinic Hospital ― Rochester, Saint Marys Campus, into a vaccination site. This space will include 15 vaccination stations, two privacy stations, a recovery area and a supply area.

Read more.


Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: How virtual meetings affect your mind, body

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Jeffrey Staab, chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Psychology at Mayo Clinic, discusses the psychologic and physical effects of virtual meetings.

Read more.


Consumer Health: How’s your hand-washing technique?

Washing your hands is one of the easiest and most effective ways to protect yourself, and prevent the spread of colds, the flu and COVID-19. As you touch people, surfaces and objects throughout the day, you accumulate germs on your hands. You can infect yourself with these germs by touching your eyes, nose or mouth, or spread them to others. Although it's impossible to keep your hands germ-free, washing your hands frequently can help limit the transfer of bacteria, viruses and other microbes.

Read more.


Mayo Clinic answers questions about COVID-19 vaccine

The COVID-19 vaccine is an important tool to help stop the ongoing pandemic, along with masking and physical distancing. Mayo Clinic's COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation and Distribution Workgroup have put together a list of questions and answers about the vaccine to help provide a better understanding of what you may expect.

Read more.


Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Isolation, stress and the pandemic affecting those with eating disorders

Eating disorders are complex medical issues, and the COVID-19 pandemic has created additional challenges for people who battle these disorders. For some, being home with constant access to food is difficult. For others, the lack of social support is a struggle.

Read more.


It’s not too late to vaccinate against the flu

Everybody is at risk for becoming ill with the flu. However, young children are especially at risk for severe complications from developing flu-like complications. Dr. Tina Ardon, a Mayo Clinic Family Medicine physician, says it is important for children to get vaccinated for the flu, even if they are not attending school in person.

Read more.


Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast: Social isolation during COVID-19

As the COVID-19 surge sweeps across the U.S., it's crucial that people stay home and avoid gatherings to reduce community spread of the virus.

But for some, that loneliness is becoming an epidemic within the pandemic. Social isolation, especially for people in high-risk health care facilities, like nursing homes, is taking a toll on their mental health.

Read more.


Single, streamlined process for patients being tested for COVID-19, other respiratory illnesses

On Tuesday, Dec. 8, Mayo Clinic combined the triage and testing process for COVID-19, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). For some children, the process also will include group A Streptococcus (strep throat). There will be a single process for screening, testing and sharing results at Mayo locations across the Midwest.

Read more.


Signs Midwest COVID-19 surge may be leveling off as Mayo Clinic prepares for first round of vaccinations

Dr. Amy W. Williams, executive dean of practice for Mayo Clinic, says there are good signs that suggest the COVID-19 surge may be leveling off in Mayo Clinic's Midwest regions. However, it doesn't mean people should let their guard down.

Read more.


Mayo Clinic Q and A: College students and COVID-19

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: This year has been filled with worry, stress and sadness because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now we're hearing that we shouldn't be with family and friends for holiday gatherings. I understand that this will reduce community spread of the virus, but our 20-year-old son is still at college and we are desperate to see him. What should we do?

Read more.

Samantha Rossi

Samantha Rossi

Samantha Rossi is a Digital Marketing Manager at Mayo Clinic Laboratories. She supports marketing strategies for product management and specialty testing. Samantha has worked at Mayo Clinic since 2019.