Tick-Borne Diseases

In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by "Borrelia burgdorferi" and "Borrelia mayonii" bacteria, carried primarily by "black-legged" or "deer ticks." To learn more about Lyme disease, the Mayo Clinic Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and its reference laboratory Mayo Medical Laboratories have developed “The ABCs of Lyme Disease” flash cards.

By Alyssa Frank • July 24, 2017

To help you learn more about Lyme disease, “The ABCs of Lyme Disease” flash cards include information about symptoms, treatment, and other important facts.

By Alyssa Frank • July 19, 2017

Once confined to the southern part of the U.S., the lone star tick is now being found further north and west, and so are reports of allergic reactions to meat following a tick bite. Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Medical Director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory and Co-Director of Vector-Borne Diseases Laboratory Services at Mayo Clinic, weighs in.

By Mayo Clinic News Network • July 19, 2017

Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Medical Director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory and Co-Director of Vector-Borne Diseases Laboratory Services at Mayo Clinic, discusses why the role of the white-footed mouse is so important in spreading tick-borne diseases.

By Kelley Luedke • July 10, 2017

Despite what you may have been told when you were younger, smothering or burning ticks is not a good idea. The correct removal method is even easier. Watch this video to learn how from Bobbi Pritt, M.D., a Mayo Clinic parasitic diseases expert.

By Mayo Clinic News Network • July 6, 2017

Whether you’re camping, hiking, or just playing near woods this summer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says tick bites should be top of mind. Bobbi Pritt, M.D., a Mayo Clinic parasitic diseases expert, weighs in on ways to avoid ticks.

By Mayo Clinic News Network • July 4, 2017

In a recent article in the Star Tribune, Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, weighs in on bugs present in Minnesota to watch out for this summer.

By Kelley Luedke • May 30, 2017

Bobbi Pritt, M.D., a Mayo Clinic parasitic diseases expert, says, as the last of the winter's snow melts, ticks start coming up from under the grass looking for a "blood meal." She says that this year, after a relatively mild winter, ticks got an early start. This means that tick season could be particularly busy. In this "Mayo Clinic Minute," Dr. Pritt explains an easy trick to remember the best ways to protect yourself from tick bites.

By Mayo Clinic News Network • May 17, 2017

On the April 22 broadcast of Mayo Clinic Radio, co-hosts Tracy McCray and Tom Shives, M.D., spoke with Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory, about an update on Lyme disease predictions for 2017.

By Kelley Luedke • May 2, 2017

With tick season underway in parts of the United States, it's important to understand the signs and symptoms of Lyme disease to determine when to seek medical treatment. Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, identifies Lyme disease signs and symptoms at AccuWeather.com.

By Kelley Luedke • April 28, 2017

Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, discussed how to safety remove ticks from skin with AccuWeather.com.

By Kelley Luedke • April 21, 2017

On March 21, Bobbi Pritt, M.D., Director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, presented “Advances in Diagnosing Tickborne Diseases” during a live webcast for the Centers for Disease Control Public Health Grand Rounds session.

By apriljosselyn • April 4, 2017

During summer activities, it's bound to happen. But how dangerous is it to accidentally swallow a bug? Bobbi Pritt, M.D., a microbiologist, pathologist, and Director of the Clinical Parasitology Laboratory at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, discusses when swallowing an insect is harmless and which ones can be dangerous in The Wall Street Journal column entitled, "Burning Question."

By Kelley Luedke • July 27, 2015