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Ceramide risk score outperforms cholesterol testing.
Ceramides independent of traditional biomarkers confer risk.
Concentrations of ceramides and their ratios determine risk scores.
Cardiovascular events are predicted within one year among patients with established CAD.

NOW THERE’S
A BETTER WAY
TO FIGHT HEART DISEASE.

There is a better way to predict which patients are at the greatest risk and need immediate intervention for heart disease.

MI-HEART ceramides is a blood test that measures the risk of adverse cardiovascular events and quantifies plasma ceramides, which are clinically shown to be novel biomarkers of unstable atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

More than 28 million adults are diagnosed with CAD.
Nearly one-fifth of cardiovascular events occur in the absence of traditional risk factors.
Heart attacks claimed 114,023 lives in the United States in 2015.
Approximately 2,300 people in the United States die of cardiovascular disease each day—an average of one death every 38 seconds.

Learn more about ceramides and their ability to Predict-and fight-heart disease.

The MI-HEART blood test has the potential to save patients' lives. With so many confirmed and suspected CAD cases in patients, it can be difficult to know who is at the greatest risk and needs immediate intervention.

Fill out the form below to request more information.

MI-HEART ceramides is available in the U.S. exclusively through Mayo Clinic Laboratories and marketed as Hertta in Europe and published as CERT in scientific literature.

  1. Laaksonen R, Ekroos K, Sysi-Aho M, et al. Plasma ceramides predict cardiovascular death in patients with stable coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes beyond LDL-cholesterol. Eur Heart J. 2016 April;28:pii: ehw148. [Epub ahead of print]
  2. Khot UN, Khot MB, Bajzer CT, et al. Prevalence of conventional risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. JAMA. 2003 Aug;290(7):898—904.
  3. Benjamin EJ, Verani SS, Calaway CW, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics 2018 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation.