Perspectives

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features the following worm noted in the toilet of a patient with an extensive international travel history. See a video of this parasite here. What’s the identification?

By MCL Education • May 22, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features an interesting finding in a concentrated stool specimen. The individual structures are approximately 25 micrometers in length, while the longer tubular structure is 330 micrometers long. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • May 15, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features multiple small (3-6 µm), round structures identified after a stool specimen was submitted for parasite examination. The patient is a 15-year-old boy returning from swimming camp, who presents with several-day history of profuse watery diarrhea. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • May 8, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. The following structures were seen on a non-nutrient agar culture that had been inoculated with corneal scrapings. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • May 1, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features objects found in a middle-aged male patient’s stool. Individually, they measured approximately 1 cm in length. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • April 24, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features objects seen in a human stool specimen and measure approximately 80 micrometers in length. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • April 17, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features a finding in a concentrated stool specimen. The scale bars each represent 2.5 micrometers. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • April 10, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case: “Your boss brings in some wormy things and mentions that ‘his cat regurgitated these in the morning’.” What is your diagnosis? Risk for humans?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • April 3, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features objects seen in a liver cyst aspirate. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • March 27, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features the following objects found in stool of a toddler living in the Oceania region. There were motile and described as “rice like”. Microscopic examination of the expressed material revealed structures measuring 25-35 µm in diameter. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • March 20, 2019

In this “Chat with the Chair” podcast, William Morice, II, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology (DLMP) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and President of Mayo Clinic Laboratories (MCL), sits down with Curtis Hanson, M.D., Chief Medical Officer of MCL, to discuss value-based medicine.

By Suzanne R. Ferguson • March 15, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features the following, seen in a scraping of a papule from a patient with rosacea. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • March 13, 2019

Every week, Mayo Clinic microbiologist Bobbi Pritt, M.D., posts a new Parasite Wonders case. This week’s case features objects seen in a stool specimen (direct wet prep) from a child with watery diarrhea. The objects measure approximately 40-45 µm in length. What’s the identification?

By Bobbi Pritt, M.D. • March 6, 2019